Thursday, March 31, 2011

Joanna S. Rose and The 651 Quilts

Imagine Stonehenge, Frank Lloyd Wright's Guggenheim spiral and an Alexander Calder mobile all rolled into one . . . then QUILT-IFY that image by 651 red-and-white quilts.

That was the effect of The Joanna S. Rose Quilt Exhibit at The Armory this week.  My photos don't do justice to this extraordinary display, but I wanted to share some favorite pieces.

To this observer, there's a direct connection between quiltmaking and puzzlemaking.  Quilting, like crosswords, is an art based on a rock-solid architecture of math and symmetry.  Once the math is satisfied, you're free to make art.  Or maybe, the math is the art.  Whatever . . . you're the judge.

The display was dazzling and I walked home inspired, humbled and full of new puzzle ideas.


Quilts suspended from the ceiling in a spiral formation




A simple rickrack design at eye level


Flowers, pinwheels, eight-pointed stars


The power of the repeated pattern


Closeup of hand-stitched artistry


Stripes, airplanes, triangles, quaker patterns . . .  


Geometry


My favorite quilt:  Optical illusion with lush corner details

~ ~ ~ 

4 comments:

Theresa a/k/a Terry said...

So you did make it to the exhibit! It was just extraordinary, wasn't it? I too came away not only awed, but inspired.

Love your photos!

JaxInL.A. said...

This is truly extraordinary. It's a bit like a piece by Christo, only inside out.

Being in California, I will only see this in photos. Thanks for taking good ones! I can't wait to share this with my quilting friend.

quilter1 said...

Thank you for the quilt photos. I made a red and white quilt for my spiritual director, the West Wind block, with swirling quilting, symbolizing the Holy Spirit.
Thanks you also for very enjoyable puzzles. I always enjoy seeing your name.

La Liz said...

Thanks for checking out the photos. The great thing about this quilt show was the breadth of interest. Kids, businessmen on their lunch hour, tour groups -- they all came to admire these amazing works. Bravo to the quilting artists!